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Commonwealth Brewing Boujee Milk Stout

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Known for their striking can design and commitment to quality beer, Commonwealth Brewing has a new milk stout just in time for cooler temperatures. Boujee is an Imperial Chocolate Vanilla...

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Ferret
3 days ago
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Bring me aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaall of this.
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Dell’s newest monitor is a 49-inch, dual QHD, curved behemoth

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Valentina Palladino

Ultra-wide monitors are overwhelming yet impressive to behold, and Dell thinks it has made one that will appeal to all types of professionals. The new U4919DW UltraSharp 49-inch curved monitor nods to the massive gaming monitors made by Samsung, MSI, and others, but it adds a workplace spin while upping the resolution to QHD.

Dell describes the U4919DW as the equivalent of two 27-inch monitors stuck together, and its dual mode cements that comparison. Users can fill the entire screen with their desired programs, or they can split it down the middle so the display literally looks like a beast with two heads—two different screens sitting side by side on a single stand.

While one person could use this monitor and bask in its 5120×1440-resolution glory on their own, Dell designed it to accommodate two people (or two digital work spaces). Its Picture-by-Picture mode lets you connect two PCs to the monitor at once, viewing one machine's content on the right side of the monitor and the other PC's contents on the left. Using Dell's Keyboard, Video, and Mouse feature, one wired or wireless keyboard and mouse can control both PCs as well.

As with all Dell monitors, the company's Display Manager software works with the U4919DW. The Easy Arrange feature will likely be a favorite for anyone using this monitor, because it lets you position open windows next to each other as neat tiles, keeping everything organized and in view. The Auto-Restore feature maintains that order even when you disconnect from the monitor—all of your open windows will be right where you left them when you reconnect.

Let's take a look at the specs: it's a dual 5120×1440 display with a 32:9 aspect ratio and an in-plane switching panel. It can achieve a 60Hz refresh rate, but you'll need the proper graphics card to get it there. The U4919DW doesn't have Nvidia G-Sync or AMD FreeSync technology, so it won't appeal to gamers as much as it will other types of professionals. Instead of Dell Premier color, it has 99 percent sRGB color gamut with Comfort View to filter out blue light.

The U4919DW uses just one USB-C port to connect to your PC. That port supports data, video, and power, and the monitor has a 90W power supply so it can charge up your PC. In addition, it has two HDMI ports, one DisplayPort, five USB-A 3.0 downstream ports, and two USB-A 3.0 upstream ports.

Dell understands that a monitor like the U4919DW will appeal to some industries more than others. Financial programs were the majority of those demoed when I saw the monitor in person, showing how stock brokers and others in the financial sector could use the behemoth to be more productive and multitask better. But Dell's also banking on those in other industries who already know the value of having multiple external monitors. More screen space means more space to think, organize, and produce. Rather than fumbling with two or more monitors, Dell is hoping more people will gravitate to the single, gigantic-monitor experience.

But like all monitors of this size and quality, it comes at a high price. The Dell U4919DW UltraSharp 49-inch curved monitor will be available starting at $1,699 on October 26.

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Ferret
3 days ago
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I love ultra-wides. This one is impressive.
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The new Palm is a tiny phone to keep you away from your phone

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It’s tiny, clever, and exclusive to Verizon

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Ferret
3 days ago
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Kinda neat. Why Verizon only, though, I wonder?
jhamill
3 days ago
A joint ad campaign (TCL and VZW) to get the name back in the public?
Ferret
3 days ago
Not impossible - you'd think they'd have gone for a more compelling offering if they wanted to reintroduce the Palm brand though
jhamill
3 days ago
All the articles I see when searching say the same thing: palm brand is comnig back with new phone in 2018. I think it's just like the Blackberry "come back". TCL will release a device to see if they should make more. Verizon took the bait because they're Verizon.
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DC Comics' SECRET SIX is Being Developed as a TV Series at CBS

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The DC Comics comic book property Secret Six is being developed into a drama series by CBS. This is a comic that I’m not really familiar with, but judging from the description, it sounds like it will be an intriguing show.

Secret Six follows “six morally ambiguous strangers, each with their own unique specialties and secret pasts. They are brought together by an enigmatic figure who blackmails them into working as a team to expose the corruption of the corporate and political elite.”

The Secret Six has had a rotating roster of members over the years that includes Bane, Harley Quinn, Lex Luthor, Mad Hatter, Penguin, Deadshot, Cheshire, Scandal Savage, Fiddler, Catman and more. I imagine the series will focus more on the lesser known characters.

The series seems like it will be very similar to Suicide Squad as it centers on a team of misfit rogues who are forced to do good. Who knows, maybe Secret Six will do it better!

The series will be written by Rick Muirragui (Suits) who will also be an executive produce alongside Bill Lawrence (Scrubs) and Jeff Ingold.

Is this a DC series you’d be excited about watching?

Source: Variety



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Ferret
7 days ago
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whaaaaaat. Has CBS done any superhero stuff yet? Not sure if they'll be able to make Secret Six work, but man I hope they can.
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Google announces its first tablet in three years, the Pixel Slate

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Enlarge (credit: Google)

After the death of Android tablets, Google has been slowly rebooting its tablet ambitions under the Chrome OS banner. After debuting the concept with the Acer Chromebook Tab 10, Google now has its first-party Chrome OS tablet hardware, the Pixel Slate.

The device has a more-than-passing resemblance to the Microsoft Surface or iPad Pro: there's a tablet, and a keyboard cover, and a pen. The tablet is an Intel-powered device with 4-16GB of RAM and a 3000×2000 display. Single USB-C ports are found on the left and right sides, and a pogo pin connection is on the bottom.

This is the first Chrome OS device to support biometrics—on the top of the device is a power button that doubles as a fingerprint scanner. Inside, Google has a Titan security chip (originally designed for its cloud servers) to protect against various kinds of tampering and provide safe storage for secrets.

The back of the device doesn't do a great job of looking like a "Pixel" device. While the phones and the Pixelbook had a two-tone glass and aluminum design, the Pixel Slate is one solid piece of metal with only a "G" logo in the corner. It's a fetching blue color.

There are 8MP cameras on the front and back, and like a Pixel phone, Google is providing computational photography magic in the Pixel Slate. The company is making the Android Google Camera app work on the Pixel Slate, so you'll get bokeh effects and, hopefully, excellent-looking pictures. The front-facing camera has a wide-angle lens and larger pixels, optimized for video chatting. And for sound there are two front-firing speakers.

The pogo pins on the bottom connect to a keyboard. Google has a first-party keyboard cover with crazy-looking round keys and a trackpad. The keyboard cover supports multiple screen angles and acts as a screen cover when it's closed. If you're looking for a more solid keyboard option, Brydge has an attachable keyboard base with hinges, turning the tablet into a convertible laptop. The pen is actually the exact same Active Electrostatic (AES) stylus the Pixelbook launched with last year. It comes in a new color, but if you have an old Pixelbook pen lying around, it will work with both devices.

With the launch of the Pixel Slate, Google is back in the tablet game after a three-year absence. Compared to Google's last tablet, 2015's Pixel C, a lot has changed. Android tablets are dead, and now we have Chrome OS tablets. The Bluetooth keyboard, with all its connection issues, has been replaced with a physical pogo-pin connection. A mouse is now a primary control method. If tablet apps on Android were a problem, you now have Android apps in a floating window, a full desktop browser, and Linux apps on Chrome OS.

$599 gets you a Celeron with 4GB RAM and 32GB storage. $799 bumps that up to an 8th generation Core m3 with 8GB RAM and 64GB storage, $999 gets an 8th generation Core i5 with 8GB RAM and 128GB storage, and $1,599 gets an 8th generation Core i7 with 16GB RAM and 256GB storage. The keyboard is another $199, and then pen is $99. Initial availability will be in the US, Canada, and the UK "later this year."

 

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Ferret
9 days ago
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Here’s what it would take to stop climate change sooner

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Enlarge (credit: IPCC)

One of the biggest surprises leading up to the 2015 international Paris Agreement on climate-changing emissions was an argument about a new goal. Nations settled on a target of limiting global warming to no more than 2°C a while back. Most argument since has centered on the fact that our actions haven't been sufficient to reach that goal. But in Paris, a few vulnerable nations decided to stand up and say that 2.0°C wasn’t good enough. Low-lying island nations, for example, weren’t satisfied with negotiating toward a goal that might not even save them.

In the end, the Paris Agreement noted that nations were striving to keep warming “well below” 2°C. The problem with even a slight shift in goals is that the scientific work done in advance of the international talks hadn’t provided results for a 1.5°C scenario.

While government representatives are frankly buried by more high-quality scientific information than they really need to make sound decisions about the urgency of slowing climate change, they ordered up a 1.5°C addendum. After working overtime for the last couple of years, scientists volunteering for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) have now provided a report summarizing what existing research tells us about a 1.5ºC warmer world.

The basic gist is hardly surprising—the impacts of 1.5°C warming are slightly less than 2.0°C, and it’s harder to cut greenhouse gas emissions fast enough to meet the lower target. But when you put numbers on these things, some effects are particularly notable, and the roadmap to emissions cuts becomes crystal clear.

A new world

The report notes that we are currently at a warming of about 1.0°C, with the warming trend rolling along at 0.2±0.1°C per decade. If we eliminated all our emissions today, we would still see a bit more warming (as sunlight-reflecting aerosol pollution quickly washed out of the atmosphere, for example) but probably not enough to send us coasting helplessly across the 1.5°C limit. Still, at our current rate, we’re set to reach 1.5°C between 2030 and 2052.

Some impacts of climate change show particularly large jumps between 1.5 and 2.0°C. Heat waves, heavy precipitation, and regional droughts increase steeply, along with their related human health impacts. Ecosystems, too, would benefit greatly from limiting warming. Of the more than 100,000 terrestrial species that have been studied, for example, the number expected to disappear from half their range doubles between 1.5 and 2.0°C. Coral reefs have a particularly dire outlook. We expect to lose 75 to 90 percent of coral reefs by 1.5°C; at 2.0 °C, that number is over 99 percent.

The report estimates that sea-level rise in the year 2100 would be around 10 centimeters lower in a 1.5°C world than a 2.0°C world. That may not sound like much in comparison to oft-discussed worst-case scenarios of more than a meter of sea level rise, but 10 million people live in areas that would be affected by those extra 10 centimeters.

Can we do it?

So is it possible to steer the ship to a 1.5°C limit? It’s worth noting that we haven’t even promised enough action to duck under 3.0°C, much less hit a lower goal, but it’s not physics that stands in our way. The report shows a number of technically possible pathways to cut emissions quickly enough to stabilize Earth’s climate at 1.5°C, but the margins are bloody thin.

The “good” news is that this report slightly raised the estimated amount of greenhouse gas we can emit before crossing the 1.5°C or 2.0°C limits (in line with recent research we have covered). The bad news is that it would still require a Herculean effort. To halt warming at 1.5°C, global emissions would have to drop around 45 percent by 2030—barely more than a decade from now. By 2050, we would have to hit net zero emissions—any remaining emissions would have to be counteracted by active removal of CO2 from the atmosphere.

Compared to the already tall task of meeting the 2.0°C goal, this effort would require even more efficiency gains to bring down total energy demand. Capturing emissions from natural gas plants and storing them underground would be necessary to enable more rapid cuts. Coal would have to be a relic of the past. Transportation (and other sectors) would need to be electrified and run on the new, cleaner grid rather than on fossil fuels. And atmospheric carbon dioxide removal techniques would need to be employed on a truly significant scale.

If the world did find the political and personal will to pull together and put in that kind of effort, the report shows that those actions would benefit more than just the climate. Looking at a set of United Nations sustainable development goals, while there are certainly some trade-offs, most actions to limit global warming and its impacts would make life better in multiple ways. Doing so would certainly require massive investments, but they would pay off.

In short, the report’s answer for governments is that limiting warming to 1.5 °C would come with large benefits, and it is still technically possible. Now we find out whether governments will do anything with that knowledge.

In an IPCC press conference Monday morning in Korea, Imperial College London’s Jim Skea took a question about the importance of reforestation vs. fossil fuel cuts as an opportunity to summarize the report’s basic message: “[S]aying ‘option x or option y’ is not the way that this report is framed. The word ‘or’ does not work in relation to the ambition of 1.5º warming. The only linking word you can use is ‘and’[…] So the key thing is, option x AND option y AND option z is the only option we really have to achieve this kind of level of ambition.”

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Ferret
10 days ago
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